[About the Author]
[TAO TE CHING]
[Lao Tzu and Buddha]
[Biblical Wisdom]
[Happiness Wisdom]
[Over-Doing]
[A Better and Happier You]
[No Ego]
The MANIFESTATIONS and the MYSTERIES

“If His ways could be explained or understood,
the Creator would no longer be infinite.
If he had a name or an identity,
the Creator would no longer be eternal.

Being infinite and eternal,
the Creator is the origin of all things.
Once given a name and an identity,
mankind is only the source of all things.

Ever humble, we see the mysteries of all things created.
Ever proud, we see only the manifestations of all things created.

Only the mysteries, and not the manifestations,
show us the Way to spirituality and salvation.”
(Tao Te Ching, Chapter 1)

What Lao Tzu is trying to say in the first chapter of his immortal classic Tao Te Ching is that there are many things happening in the world that are beyond human understanding. It is human futility striving to explain or understand them, because we are finite and the Creator is infinite. But with humility, and not pride, we may become enlightened.

“Beyond all question, the mystery from which true godliness springs is great:
He appeared in the flesh,
    was vindicated by the Spirit,
was seen by angels,
    was preached among the nations,
was believed on in the world,
    was taken up in glory.”
(1 Timothy 3: 16)

“since what may be known about God is plain to them, because God has made it plain to them.” (Romans 1:19)

The bottom line: The Creator has no name. We see only the manifestations of human creations, but not the mysteries of the Creator’s creations unless we become enlightened when we have humility with our complete trust and dependence on the Creator.
ANGER and TAO

Near the end of 2016, a road rage occurred in Arkansas, ending in the death of a 3-year-old boy.

A woman, with her 3-year-old grandson sitting at the back of her car, stopped at a stop sign. A man in the car right behind honked her, and the woman honked back; the road rage then began with the man firing a gun shot at the woman’s car, and ended in tragedy.

Reflective Thoughts

What could possibly be going on in the mind of the aggressor and that of the victim at the stop sign right before the tragedy?

It could have been: “You’re in my way, dude!”; “I’ve as much a right as you do to be where I am!”; “Get the hell out of my way!”; “How dare you honk me! Who do you think you are?”

What would the woman and the aggressor be thinking now?

Conventional Wisdom

The American society encourages the “right” to express oneself, including one’s negative emotions. Instead of reigning in your negative emotions, you are entitled to giving vent to all your negative impulses-even at the expense of hurting others’ feelings. This undisciplined emotion is the failure to restrain the negative impulses, which often cause human conflicts and destroy human relationships, not to mention violence and even deaths.

Always be mindful of your undisciplined negative impulses to express yourself, thinking it is your right.

Tao Wisdom

According to Tao, take a deep breath, review the situation, and ask yourself one simple question: What is the original purpose of driving your car-to get to your destination, or to get angry?

Don’t hold your anger in; instead, let it go, by breathing it out. Don’t let it go as pain; instead, let it go as your acceptance. Your acceptance should be viewed not as a sign of your own weakness but as a statement of your own communication to yourself that getting to your destination is much more important than getting angry.

Tao teaches that peace is the true warrior’s path. The sword while an option is never used with anger, or you may have got lost from the start. According to Lao Tzu, “The best fighter is never becoming angry.”

Learn to do the following when you become very angry:

Take a deep diaphragm breat, and just feel it.

Just look at your anger in your mind.

Accept that you are now angry, and then slowly release your anger as you breathe it out.

If necessary, use your arm like a sword to sweep away your anger and cut through your feelings of anger, while saying: “I can see my anger: it is as it was.”

The truth about anger is that, subconsciously, we all exert a great deal of mental energy to hold on to the past, which is no more than what we think happened. In the now, what happened in the past is just a memory, and no longer there; all memories are no longer truths, but at best only guidelines for the future. That is to say, your anger is as it was. Just learn to release your anger over any issue. Anger on its own has no power at all, except the power you give it to make it real to you.

The bottom line: Anger is often caused by an inflated ego that one has to be right about an issue; without an ego, nothing can anger or trouble you. Seek only your internal balance and harmony.

“We do not become aggressive when we are confronted.
We do not become angry when we are provoked.
We see neither an enemy nor a competitor,
because we do not seek our own way.

Knowing both our strengths and weaknesses,
we use them to complement one another.
Thus, we find balance and harmony.
Naturally and easily, we follow the Way.”
(Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 68)

Remember, if you have to make a choice between “being right” or “being nice”, always choose “being nice.”

Near the end of 2016, a road rage occurred in Arkansas, ending in the death of a 3-year-old boy.

A woman, with her 3-year-old grandson sitting at the back of her car, stopped at a stop sign. A man in the car right behind honked her, and the woman honked back; the road rage then began with the man firing a gun shot at the woman’s car, and ended in tragedy.

Reflective Thoughts

What could possibly be going on in the mind of the aggressor and that of the victim at the stop sign right before the tragedy?

It could have been: “You’re in my way, dude!”; “I’ve as much a right as you do to be where I am!”; “Get the hell out of my way!”; “How dare you honk me! Who do you think you are?”

What would the woman and the aggressor be thinking now?

Conventional Wisdom

The American society encourages the “right” to express oneself, including one’s negative emotions. Instead of reigning in your negative emotions, you are entitled to giving vent to all your negative impulses-even at the expense of hurting others’ feelings. This undisciplined emotion is the failure to restrain the negative impulses, which often cause human conflicts and destroy human relationships, not to mention violence and even deaths.

Always be mindful of your undisciplined negative impulses to express yourself, thinking it is your right.

Tao Wisdom

According to Tao, take a deep breath, review the situation, and ask yourself one simple question: What is the original purpose of driving your car-to get to your destination, or to get angry?

Don’t hold your anger in; instead, let it go, by breathing it out. Don’t let it go as pain; instead, let it go as your acceptance. Your acceptance should be viewed not as a sign of your own weakness but as a statement of your own communication to yourself that getting to your destination is much more important than getting angry.

Tao teaches that peace is the true warrior’s path. The sword while an option is never used with anger, or you may have got lost from the start. According to Lao Tzu, “The best fighter is never becoming angry.”

Learn to do the following when you become very angry:

Take a deep diaphragm breat, and just feel it.

Just look at your anger in your mind.

Accept that you are now angry, and then slowly release your anger as you breathe it out.

If necessary, use your arm like a sword to sweep away your anger and cut through your feelings of anger, while saying: “I can see my anger: it is as it was.”

The truth about anger is that, subconsciously, we all exert a great deal of mental energy to hold on to the past, which is no more than what we think happened. In the now, what happened in the past is just a memory, and no longer there; all memories are no longer truths, but at best only guidelines for the future. That is to say, your anger is as it was. Just learn to release your anger over any issue. Anger on its own has no power at all, except the power you give it to make it real to you.

The bottom line: Anger is often caused by an inflated ego that one has to be right about an issue; without an ego, nothing can anger or trouble you. Seek only your internal balance and harmony.

“We do not become aggressive when we are confronted.
We do not become angry when we are provoked.
We see neither an enemy nor a competitor,
because we do not seek our own way.

Knowing both our strengths and weaknesses,
we use them to complement one another.
Thus, we find balance and harmony.
Naturally and easily, we follow the Way.”
(Lao Tzu, Tao Te Ching, Chapter 68)

Remember, if you have to make a choice between “being right” or “being nice”, always choose “being nice.”

The above is taken from the book The Happiness Wisdom by Stephen Lau


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